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morality versus obedience

the moral sense

"There is no way of coming at a true theory of society, but by inquiring into the nature of its component individuals.

To understand humanity in its combinations, it is necessary to analyze humanity in its elementary form.

We quickly find that every phenomenon exhibited by an amalgamation of men, originates in some quality of the individual man.

A little consideration shows us, for instance, that the very existence of society, implies some natural affinity in its members for such a union.

It is pretty clear too, that without a certain fitness in mankind for ruling, and being ruled, government would be an impossibility.

The infinitely complex organizations of commerce, have grown up under the stimulus of certain desires existing in each of us.

It is from our possession of an emotion to which they appeal, that religious institutions have been called into existence.

We see throughout nature that the properties of a community are dependent upon the attributes of its component parts.

Every social phenomenon must have its origin in a property of the individual.

Just as the attractions and affinities which are latent in separate atoms, become visible when those atoms are approximated; so the forces that are dormant in the isolated men, are rendered active by juxtaposition with his fellows.

Social philosophy suggests moral law originates in some attribute of the human being.

Had we no other inducement to eat than that arising from the prospect of certain advantages to be thereby obtained, it is scarcely probable that our bodies would be so well cared for as now.

If, in addition to these needs of the body, all other requirements of our nature were similarly consigned to the sole care of the intellect - were knowledge, property, freedom, reputation, friends, sought only at the intellects dictation - then our investigations would be perpetual, our estimates complex, our decisions so difficult that life would be wholly occupied in the collection of evidence and the balancing of probabilities.

Quite different, however, is the method of nature.

We find in ourselves some prompter called a desire; and the more essential the action, the more powerful is the impulse to its performance, and the more intense the gratification derived therefrom.

Thus, the longings for food, for sleep, for warmth, are irresistible; and quite independent of foreseen advantages.

The continuance of humanity is secured not in obedience to reason but often in defiance of it.

That men are not impelled to accumulate the means of subsistence solely by a view to consequences, is proved by the existence of skinflints, in whom the love of acquirement is gratified to the neglect of the ends.

We find employed a like system of regulating our conduct to our fellows.

That we may behave in the public sight in the most agreeable manner, we possess a love of praise.





It is desirable that there should be a segregation of those best fitted for companionship - hence the sentiment of friendship.

May we not then reasonably expect to find a like instrumentality employed in impelling us to that line of conduct, in the due observance of which consists what we call morality ?

We are guided to our bodily welfare by instincts; that from instincts also, spring those domestic relationships - and that similar agencies are used to secure our indirect benefit, by regulating social behaviour.

As upright conduct in each is necessary to the happiness of all, there exists in us an impulse towards such conduct; we possess a "Moral Sense," a duty of which is to dictate rectitude in our transactions with each other; which receives gratification from honest and fair dealing; and which gives birth to the sentiment of justice.

"And so you think," says the patrician, "that the object of our rule should be 'the greatest happiness to the greatest number.'"

"Such is our opinion," answers the petitioning plebeian.

Whereupon, after some shuffling, our petitioner is forced to confess, that he has no other authority but his own feeling—that he has simply an innate perception of the fact; or, in other words, that "his moral sense tells him so."
In truth, none but those committed to a preconceived theory, can fail to recognise, on every hand, the workings of such a faculty.

From early times downward there have been constant signs of its presence - signs which happily thicken as our own day is approached.

The articles of Magna Charta embody its protests against oppression, and its demands for a better administration of justice.

But how, it may be asked, can an emotion have perception?

How can a desire give rise to a moral sense ?

To elucidate this we must take an example.

Contrast the skinflint and the spendthrift.

Accompanying his devotedness to accumulation, the skinflint has a quite peculiar belief in the worth of money.

The most stringent economy he thinks virtuous; and anything like the most ordinary liberality vicious; whilst of extravagance he has an absolute horror.

Whatever adds to his store seems to him good, whatever takes from it, bad.

Should a passing gleam of generosity lead him on some special occasion to open his purse, he is pretty sure afterwards to reproach himself as having done wrong.

Whilst the spendthrift is deficient in the instinct of acquisition, he also fails to realize the intrinsic worth of property;

The spendthrift regards saving habits as mean; and holds that there is something noble in profuseness.

Is there not here a confounding of intellectual intelligence with emotional intelligence?

It is clear that these opposite perceptions of the propriety or impropriety of certain lines of conduct, do not originate with the intellect, but with the emotional faculties.





The intellect, uninfluenced by desire, would show both skinflint and spendthrift that their habits were unwise; whereas the intellect, influenced by desire, makes each think the other a fool, but does not enable him to see his own foolishness.

Every desire is accompanied by a moral sense of the rightness of those actions which give it gratification.

Human desire generates the moral sense that things are good or bad, according to the pleasure or pain they bring; and would always generate such convictions, were it unopposed.

However, there is nearly always a perpetual emotional conflict - an antagonism throughout life resulting from the incongruity of belief.

It is only where a desire is very predominant, or where no adverse desire exists, that the connection between the instincts and the opinions they dictate, becomes distinctly visible.

"If," say the objectors, "this 'moral sense' originates different notions of duty in each age, each race, each individual, how can it afford a safe foundation for a systematic morality?"

What can seem to be more absurd than to seek a definite rule of right, in the answers of so uncertain an authority?

The phenomena of social life, both past and present, well illustrate the influence of the moral sense which is not readily explicable upon any other hypothesis.

Although the decisions of the moral sense upon the complex cases referred to it are inaccurate and often contradictory, it may still be capable of generating a fundamental moral intuition, which can be logically unfolded into a scientific morality." - Herbert Spencer



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This website defines a new perspective with which to engage reality to which its author adheres. The author feels that the falsification of reality outside personal experience has forged a populace unable to discern propaganda from reality and that this has been done purposefully by an international corporate cartel through their agents who wish to foist a corrupt version of reality on the human race. Religious intolerance occurs when any group refuses to tolerate religious practices, religious beliefs or persons due to their religious ideology. This web site marks the founding of a system of philosophy named The Truth of the Way of Life - a rational religion based on reason which requires no leap of faith, accepts no tithes, has no supreme leader, no church buildings and in which each and every individual is encouraged to develop a personal relation with the Creator and Sustainer through the pursuit of the knowledge of reality in the hope of curing the spiritual corruption that has enveloped the human spirit. The tenets of The Truth of the Way of Life are spelled out in detail on this web site by the author. Violent acts against individuals due to their religious beliefs in America is considered a "hate crime."

This web site in no way condones violence. To the contrary the intent here is to reduce the violence that is already occurring due to the international corporate cartels desire to control the human race. The international corporate cartel already controls the world economic system, corporate media worldwide, the global industrial military entertainment complex and is responsible for the collapse of morals, the elevation of self-centered behavior and the destruction of global ecosystems. Civilization is based on cooperation. Cooperation does not occur at the point of a gun.

American social mores and values have declined precipitously over the last century as the corrupt international cartel has garnered more and more power. This power rests in the ability to deceive the populace in general through corporate media by pressing emotional buttons which have been preprogrammed into the population through prior mass media psychological operations. The results have been the destruction of the family and the destruction of social structures that do not adhere to the corrupt international elites vision of a perfect world. Through distraction and coercion the direction of thought of the bulk of the population has been directed toward solutions proposed by the corrupt international elite that further consolidates their power and which further their purposes.

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